YOUNG OFFENDERS

[2018] EWCA Crim 2464 [2018] EWCA Crim 2464

An eight-year extended sentence, comprising a five-year custodial term and a three-year extension period, was appropriate in the case of a 15-year-old who had been convicted of wounding with intent. The nature of the offence, the stabbing of a woman on the street at night, together with the offender’s lack of self-control and propensity for aggression meant that he was dangerous and an extended sentence was necessary to protect the public.

A sentence of detention at Her Majesty’s pleasure with a minimum term of 17 years for murder was not manifestly excessive; whilst the offence was not premeditated and the young offender had had no intention to kill, he had taken a knife to the crime scene and some premeditation was inherent.

[2018] EWCA Crim 1156 [2018] EWCA Crim 1156

A sentence of four years’ detention for three counts of possession of

[2018] EWCA Crim 1003 [2018] EWCA Crim 1003

A judge had failed to have proper regard to the sentencing guidelines for children and young people when sentencing an 18-year-old for an offence of manslaughter committed when she was 17. The sentence imposed of nine years’ detention did not reflect the age, immaturity and resultant culpability of the offender at the date of the offence, and was reduced to five years’ detention.

[2018] EWCA Crim 547 [2018] EWCA Crim 547

A judge’ directions to the jury as to the meaning of “acts of terrorism” and other terms within the Terrorism Act 2006 s.2 had adequately protected a young offender’s ECHR art.10 rights.